Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Visualization’ Category

Love this map!  Thanks Brandon M. Anderson!

Concentration of People in the City of Syracuse

Concentration of People in the City of Syracuse

Read Full Post »

A newspaper in the suburbs of New York City needs armed guards after editors published a map of pistol permit holders in Westchester and Rockland Counties. Yes, this is a public database. A link from the AP story to the original publication by the Journal News reveals no maps currently. Perhaps they have been taken down or the server has been overloaded with the new interest?  The December story by the Journal News had been developed in response to the Sandy Hook shootings. Details can be found here. The AP provides a screen shot:

Pistol Permits in the NYC Suburbs

Pistol Permits in the NYC Suburbs

Read Full Post »

Wow! 341,817,095 Dots!

Great new interactive map created by Brandon M. Anderson at the MIT Media Lab. Check it out here.

Census Dotmap of North America

Census Dotmap of North America

Read Full Post »

Each year, I begin my course on Ecology and Design with quotes from astronauts who have seen Earth from space, and I remind my students of the first time humans were able to get this awe-inspiring view of Earth. After 40 years of Earth imagery, we take this perspective for granted, I’m afraid. The 40th anniversary of the Blue Marble image, shot by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972, is celebrated in a short film by Planetary Collective.

The quotes that I use in my class are the following:

Suddenly, from behind the rim of the moon, in long, slow-motion moments of immense majesty, there emerges a sparkling blue and white jewel, a light, delicate sky-blue sphere laced with slowly swirling veils of white, rising gradually like a small pearl in a thick sea of black mystery. It takes more than a moment to fully realize this is Earth . . . home.
- Edgar Mitchell, USA

For the first time in my life I saw the horizon as a curved line. It was accentuated by a thin seam of dark blue light – our atmosphere. Obviously this was not the ocean of air I had been told it was so many times in my life. I was terrified by its fragile appearance.
- Ulf Merbold, Federal Republic of Germany

The Earth was small, light blue, and so touchingly alone, our home that must be defended like a holy relic. The Earth was absolutely round. I believe I never knew what the word round meant until I saw Earth from space.
- Aleksei Leonov, USSR

Before I flew I was already aware of how small and vulnerable our planet is; but only when I saw it from space, in all its ineffable beauty and fragility, did I realize that human kind’s most urgent task is to cherish and preserve it for future generations.
- Sigmund Jähn, German Democratic Republic

Read Full Post »

Carl Franzen, of Talking Points Memo, brings us up to date on the latest from Google Maps – high resolution imagery and new 45-degree angle imagery.

High-resolution image of the clock tower, Abraj Al Bait, in Mecca, Saudi Arabia from Google Maps

Read Full Post »

How to re-engage after a month of few blog posts due to the rush of the academic year semester schedule? I’m checking back with some of my favorite blogs to see what I have missed. Notable posts below.

Read Full Post »

Take a look at this Next American City review of the Museum of Modern Art’s Foreclosed exhibit.

Curated by Barry Bergdoll and produced in less than three years (lightning-fast for large museums like MoMA), Foreclosed presents five architectural projects that rethink the suburbs from their economic underpinnings to their aesthetic character. But while the exhibit’s thesis that sprawl is toxic jives with that of many urbanists, the architectural remedies on display seem almost as problematic.

And the crux of the criticism:

It was critically apparent that none of the architects participating in the exhibit actually live in the suburbs (a fact confirmed by the exhibit’s curator). …snip… This outsider perspective on the suburbs is the exhibit’s crucial flaw and inevitably influenced the architects to propose interventions in suburbia that have all the grace of a superblock in the middle of the city grid. Despite their good intentions, their efforts at sustainability and their smart alternatives to homeownership, the architects’ wrath for the suburbs has caused them to create projects that annihilate the suburbs rather than improve them.

Follow the link for the full review, and see some images from the exhibition here. And while you are at the Next American City site, check out the article titled, What Legos Can Teach Us About Civic Participation.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »